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In most cases you will need to register the death within 5 days and it is better to visit the register office in the area in which the person died. This can help avoid delays in getting the necessary documentation. If the coroner is involved you will be advised when to register the death.

Below is a guide that can help.
Please feel free to contact us for any advice on the procedure for registering a death.

Who can register:
It is normally the duty of the Next of Kin to make the arrangements for the registration of death. If there are no relatives the death may be registered by:

Someone who was present at the death.

The occupier of the building where the death occurred (e.g. the matron of a nursing home).

Anyone living in the building where the death occurred, if they have knowledge of the required particulars.

The person accepting responsibility for making the funeral arrangements.

Additionally, if the person has been found dead out of doors the death may also be registered by:

A person present at death.

The person who found the body.

The person in charge of the body.

Registering:
Before attending the Registrars Office, you will need to obtain a Medical Certificate for Registration. This is obtained from the G.P. who attended the deceased during their last illness, or from the Bereavement Services within the hospital where the death occurred. If the death occurred in Hospital or Hospice, you may also be given a release certificate that is required by ourselves.
If the death has been reported to the Coroner then it is the Coroners duty to issue this certificate. The Coroners office will make the necessary arrangements for the certificate to be delivered directly to the Registry Office in order for registration of the death to be carried out. If an inquest is opened relating to the death you will not be required to register.
The death must normally be registered in the area where it occurred, although what's called "Registration by Declaration" may be carried out at your local Registry Office. Registering in this way will cause some delay as to the timings of the funeral. Appointments are normally required in order for you to register the death.

At the registrar’s office:
The registrar will carry out a simple interview. You should take with you the medical certificate issued by the doctor showing the cause of death and if possible the deceased medical card. You will also require the following information about the deceased :

The date and place of death.

The usual address

The full name, sex and where appropriate the maiden name.

The date and place of birth.

The last full-time occupation and whether they were retired at the time of death (in the case of a married woman the name and occupation of her husband or late husband).

Marital status (if the deceased was married the date of birth of the surviving spouse).

If the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance

The registrar will issue you with:
A certificate for Burial or Cremation (also known as the Green Form, which will need to be handed to ourselves). This form Will Not be issued if the death was reported to the Coroner and Cremation is to take place.
A Certificate for Registration of Death - which is for use when the deceased was in receipt of benefits from the Department of Work and Pensions (D.W.P.) or where adjustments are required to benefits claimed by the next of kin.
A certified copy of the Death Certificates, which will be required, to attain probate or for any other financial purpose. A fee is payable for these copies which is currently £4.00 per copy, this is the fee if the request for copies of the Death Certificate is made at the time of registering the death. There may be a higher fee payable if requests for the copies are made at a later time.